Enter your keyword

Freshly brewed chamomile flower tea

Freshly brewed chamomile flower tea

Freshly brewed chamomile flower tea

Starting the New Year with a brew of fresh chamomile tea from our happy biome garden! A sprig of mint and a dash of raw Tarkine Wilderness honey added to the tea, makes this a delightful drink, tickling the tastebuds and calming to the body and the mind.

Chamomile tea has been known for its calming and anti-inflammatory effects. It can help with tension, sleep deprivation, mouth ulcers and skin aggravation. Perhaps the most studied association is the way chamomile, with its antispasmodic and mitigating constituents, can treat stomach and intestinal issues. After Christmas and the New Year and a week of indulgence, I’m sure many could do with some chamomile tea to soothe that bloated belly!

I am constantly amazed by the healing properties in our earthly biomes, how we have been provided powerful medicines (without the adverse side-effects of synthetic drugs!) literally in our backyard. A little bit of knowledge and guidance, and a willing heart to trust and experiment, and you can truly heal yourself with earth life.

How to brew fresh chamomile flowers

Serves: 1
INGREDIENTS
  • 3-4 Tbsp fresh chamomile flowers
  • 1 small, fresh sprig of mint
  • 250ml boiling water
  • ½ tsp raw honey (optional)
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. First you’ll want to pick a pot to make your tea in. If you don’t have a tea infuser, you can use a doubled over cheese cloth and a piece of string to make a makeshift tea bag. You can even place your flowers into a heat safe bowl or cup and, after steeping, pour your tea into your teacup through a fine mesh strainer.
  2. Now to harvest your herbs. For the chamomile flowers, it’s ideal to use them the same day they are harvested, as the delicate petals have a short shelf life. Otherwise, they can last a couple of days in the refrigerator, in a plastic bag with a lightly dampened paper towel. To prepare the chamomile for use, pop the head of the flower off the stem. They can even be harvested this way, so that they are immediately ready for use. It’s best to harvest the flowers first thing in the morning, just after they spread open their petals for the day. For the mint, select a small sprig off of the tender top of the plant.
  3. Fill up your tea kettle with 250ml of water and begin heating. Place 3-4 Tbsp (4 for a stronger tea) of chamomile and your mint sprig into your teapot or makeshift teabag of choice.
  4. Pour 250ml of boiling water over the chamomile flowers and mint and then steep for 5 minutes. To serve, pour into a teacup, using a fine mesh strainer as needed. Stir in honey, if using.
CLOSE
CLOSE